Nathan Foley, an infantryman from the Kinahan Cartel, was pictured buying burner phones which earned him jail time



This is Nathan Foley, the idiotic Kinahan Cartel infantryman, who buys the phones that earn him jail time.

CCTV footage shows Foley purchasing the burner devices that were to be used by Fat Freddie Thompson while directing the murder of Daithi Douglas in south Dublin city center on July 1, 2016.

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Nathan Foley buying used phones on the day of the murder
Nathan Foley was sentenced to six years in prison

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Nathan Foley was sentenced to six years in prison
Freddie Thompson spotted on CCTV

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Freddie Thompson spotted on CCTV
Daithi Douglas was killed in 2016

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Daithi Douglas was killed in 2016

But Foley’s decision to follow Thompson’s orders cost him a six-year sentence after being convicted of participating in an organized crime gang.

While Foley’s role was to buy the phones for the hit squad before the murder, his other job was to act as a “lookout” for the Garda cars on the day of the hit.

It was no surprise that he pleaded guilty to aiding Thompson’s murder squad when CCTV evidence was presented to the Special Criminal Court by investigators at Kevin Street and Kilmainham Garda stations.

And other evidence presented in court included the capture of Foley on CCTV at Little Caesars restaurant in Dublin with Thompson and Lee Canavan.

Canavan – convicted last week of the Douglas murder – joined with Foley and Thompson in celebrating the ninth victim of the Kinahan Cartel from his feud with the Hutch mob.

Our exclusive footage showed the trio arriving at the now closed restaurant for a “murder record.”

DECLARATION OF MURDER

A source said: “Foley was another young man who was simply used by Freddie Thompson.

“He was trying to be a big gangster, but he walked into a store with CCTV and bought carefree phones around the world.

“Didn’t he think he would have been linked to the gang because of the length of time he was caught on CCTV.

“Like the other two successful team members, Foley was simply consumable.

As Canavan prepares to receive his sentence next month, we also show other CCTV footage captured by detectives as they built a massive case against the four-man team.

A clear snapshot shows gunman Gareth Brophy’s getaway driver driving the Mercedes car just minutes after Douglas was shot six times.

Another image shows the car bringing the hitman – dressed in black – down the path to Bridgefoot Street as Douglas worked in his wife’s shop.

CCTV PROOF

CCTV footage also captured the four cars used by the gang on the day of the murder.

And in Thompson’s interviews with the National Criminal Investigations Bureau’s guard specialist after his arrest in November 2016, the CCTV issue was brought to the ousted gangster.

Gardai said, “From what we see on CCTV it’s obvious that you are organizing the murder of David Douglas.

“You are an experienced guy, you know how it works. Haven’t you checked the CCTV? We see you coming and going from the car that was used to assassinate David Douglas. Why would you be so obvious. Why would you do that?

The huge investigation into the successful team was led by Detective Chief Superintendent Paul Cleary, Det Superintendent. Peter O’Boyle, Detective Sergeant Adrian Whitelaw and the Detective Team from Kevin Street and Kilmainham Garda Stations.

Speaking after Canavan became the last member of the strike team to be jailed, Chief Superintendent Cleary said: “If anyone else has information about the murder, they should contact the unit. detective from Kevin Street.

“This is a very important belief because of the planning, preparation, transportation, logistics, execution and cover-up that went into this criminal enterprise. The gang knew about forensic medicine.

“Three of the four people left the jurisdiction immediately afterwards and there was an international element to the investigation.”



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